Theorising the relationship between major sports events and social sustainability

 Theorising the relationship between major sports events and social sustainability (2010, Smith): In this paper, the aim is to assess whether major sport events meet the social needs of present and future generations. The intention is not merely to the reveal the social outcomes resulting from previous events, but to review theoretical perspectives through which those effects can be understood. This facilitates understanding of why certain effects occur, rather than merely if they occur. Journal of Sport & Tourism, Volume 14, Issue 2-3, 2009. Special Issue:   Sustainability in Sport & Tourism (download...

Promoting sustainable event practice: The role of professional associations

Promoting sustainable event practice: The role of professional associations (2010, Dickson and Acodia): This study investigates the role of professional associations in promoting the sustainable agenda, and evaluates their role in educating event professionals on sustainable event practices. International Journal of Hospitality Management, Volume 29, Issue 2, June 2010, Pages...

Network analysis of tourism events: An approach to improve marketing practices for sustainable tourism

Network analysis of tourism events: An approach to improve marketing practices for sustainable tourism (2009, Hede and Stokes): This article explores the network of stakeholders associated with farmers' markets through a qualitative analysis over a period of time of an Australian farmers' market. Multiple methods of data collection were used to build a case study of the farmers' market. The findings highlight the acute need for this farmers' market, and potentially many others that are similar, to strategically establish an appropriate and effective network of stakeholders for both organizational longevity and tourism sustainability. Journal of Travel & Tourism Marketing Vol. 26,...

How green was my festival: Exploring challenges and opportunities associated with staging green events

How green was my festival: Exploring challenges and opportunities associated with staging green events (2010, Laing and Frost): This conceptual paper explores some of the issues encompassing the management and staging of a green event. It examines the importance of engaging a range of key stakeholders and considers various ways in which events are greening their operations. This paper then considers some of the challenges involved in incorporating green messages into an event theme. It concludes with an analysis of future research needs associated with green events. International Journal of Hospitality Management, Volume 29, Issue 2, June 2010, Pages 261–267. Special issue on Event...

Event stakeholder management: developing sustainable rural event practices

Event stakeholder management: developing sustainable rural event practices (2011, Reid): Changes to the economic and social fabric of rural communities in Australia have resulted in an outmigration of residents, shifting economies and disenfranchisement with rural life styles. As a result, events provide important social and recreational opportunities for residents. However, rural communities are constrained by limited resources, such as the number of individuals who are willing and able to participate in event organizations; therefore, it is essential for the sustainable organization of events that stakeholders are attracted and retained. This paper aims to apply a stakeholder theoretical approach to the organizing and planning of rural events to identify event stakeholders, monitor satisfaction and ensure stakeholder retention. International Journal of Event and Festival Management, Vol. 2 Iss: 1, pp.20 -...

Encouraging pro-environmental behaviour: the role of sustainability-focused events

Encouraging pro-environmental behaviour: the role of sustainability-focused events (2012, Mair and Laing): Tourism is a potential setting for encouraging sustainable behaviour. One popular mechanism is to stage events with a sustainability focus, aimed at fostering behaviour change amongst attendees. This paper reports on a study of a sustainability-focused event in Australia. The Transtheoretical Model (TTM) was used to explore if and how this event could potentially promote pro-environmental behaviour change amongst attendees. TTM provides a five-stage framework, linked to a series of 10 processes of change, with both attitudinal and behavioural dimensions. The stages comprise pre-contemplation, contemplation, preparation, action and maintenance. Findings suggest that this event attracts individuals already significantly committed to sustainable behaviour who are using the event as a source of encouragement and positive feedback for their lifestyle choices. They are not the audience that the organisers need to reach in order to achieve their aim of behaviour change on a broader scale. This event did, however, support the processes of change, particularly for those in the “action” and “maintenance” stages. This paper considers the implications of these findings and TTM as a research tool for the future promotion and marketing of these events to tourists, possible applications to tourism fairs and exhibitions, and to behavioural change in tourism generally. Journal of Sustainable Tourism, Vol. 21,...